IFI Welcomes New Research On Sea Lice and Wild Salmon

AFLOAT Wednesday, 06 February 201 – Inland Fisheries Ireland has welcomed “a clear acceptance of the impact of sea lice on juvenile salmon” following a recent Marine Institute publication that identifies the effect of sea lice emanating from aquaculture facilities on wild Atlantic salmon mortality.

According to IFI, the paper published in the Journal of Fish Diseases “concurs with previously published international research” that it says establishes an incontrovertible link between fish farm developments and negative effects on local wild salmon numbers, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

It adds that “the debate can now progress to identify the best methodologies to reduce or eliminate this impact” as well as moves on “the issue of escaped farmed salmon”.

In a statement on the new paper, IFI says the research “identified that just under 40% of released juvenile salmon showed a significant difference in return rate between sea lice ‘treated’ and ‘non-treated’ groups, indicating that mortality from sea lice is significant in 40% of the releases in the study. Unfortunately, there was a significant effect from sea lice in six different bays along the west coast over the study period.

“This recent study provides further evidence that salmon will be impacted by sea lice. The location of salmon farms in relation to salmon rivers and the control of sea lice prior to and during juveniles salmon migration to their high seas feeding ground is critical if wild salmon stocks are not to be impacted.

“The development of resistance to chemical treatment of sea lice and other fish husbandry problems, such as pancreas disease and amoebic gill disease, are likely to make effective sea lice control even more difficult in future years.”

IFI also highlights the Norwegian government’s concerns about the impact of sea lice and escaped farm salmon on wild salmon stocks.

The statutory body for the protection and conservation for Ireland’s inland fisheries reiterated its support for “the development of a sustainable aquaculture industry” to “safeguard wild salmon and sea trout stocks into the future”.

It adds that recommendations on the above issues have been made in its submission to the Department of the Marine on the Environmental Impact Statement regarding the proposed deep-sea organic salmon farm in Galway Bay, a scheme that has been the subject of controversy over recent months.